You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Conde Nast’ tag.

“I am not a Media Person” -Chris Anderson

chris andersonAfter hearing Chris Anderson speak this morning, I have to heartily disagree with his own statement, above.  Before becoming entrenched in the media world, Anderson was an active physicist (not sure exactly what this is, but know smart and scientific) when he was approached by Conde Nast.  Hard to believe he had never heard of this huge media conglomerate, but knowing my own Robotics/Aerospace/Mechanical “enginerding” family I’m not totally shocked.  Through his rise to the best-sellers list and award-winning EIC of Wired magazine, Anderson has maintained his scientific background through his robotics company, GeekDad.com and the technology apparent in his magazine.

In his hour and a half speech, I had to scribble to try to write down even half the things I wanted to remember.  Including, but not limited to, these enticing little tidbits:

  • We live in a messy world, and it’s only getting messier.
  • Atoms increase in worth; bits decrease (digital moving to free)
  • We need to make the most of the Old World while exploring the New World.
  • No business in their right mind would go to a 100% paid online model.
  • You can only make money off scarcity. Time, experience, food, land is scarce; digital content is not.

Chris Anderson free BookAnderson was generous enough to give us a copy of his book that’s not released until July 7 (quite a thrill in holding a book not available in public!), which is titled Free: The Future of a Radical Price. Radically, the digital version and full length audio book are free, though the premium content of abridged audio and hardcover title come with a price tag.  

Though Anderson came to speak about his magazine work, I was enthralled by his book publishing knowledge.  He shared interesting insights, from not wanting to receive royalty checks (since that means the advance wasn’t high enough), to making money from speaking as opposed to the selling of his books, to how once the coherency was decided for his book he can’t even remember the actual words pouring forth.

 

Wired - in print

Wired - in print

Another note-worthy comment made by Anderson is his openness to a digital Wired.  In fact, he made the bold statement of “If the Kindle is [made in magazine form] I will stop killing trees immediately.”  I asked about the digital magazines available today, through Zinio and the like, and Anderson explained he doesn’t think people want to read a magazine on a computer or need the physical pages, but need it to be mobile.  So my next question is: Who will be first with the mobile mag reader? There have been rumors about Conde Nast, or will Amazon lead the pack yet again?

 

Anderson is highly optimistic in his views.  Believing in the monetization emotionally – writing etc. for fulfilling reasons vs. financial, as well as future brand extensions, he in no way sees the death of publishing (an obvious sigh of relief).

Advertisements

Personalization Trend Extends to Print Magazines

Time Inc. has demonstrated surprising flexibility for such a media giant.  Seemingly fast-moving for what I imagine to be a corporate environment with many levels of approval needed, they’re changing the magazine landscape with two new print forays:

  1. MagHound
  2. Mine

logo_maghound_allMAGHOUND

Maghound is using the Netflix on-demand movie concept, but (obviously) for magazines. Spanning publishing houses (Conde Nast, Rodale, Hearst, Time Inc.), Maghound is like a virtual newsstand with home delivery.  Lori Lipson, Customer Experience Director for Maghound, spoke with us about the thoughts behind this media innovation.

Magazine companies are trying to fulfill the demands people have learned to expect through the digital experience, but deliver it via the print medium:

  1. Flexibility
  2. Control
  3. Choice
  4. Personalization

Maghound fulfills these demands, since the user can consolidate all their magazine subscriptions into one easy-to-manage account.  All your magazines are delivered to your doorstep with one monthly cost ($4.95/month for three subscriptions).  The user can change the magazines they wish to received as often as they want (so could get a different combination each month!), and also allows for easy address updates – priceless for those of us without a permanent home.

I see the opportunity with Maghound to live with the up and coming magazines.  For myself, I have subscribed to Glamour and Cosmopolitan for years, and recently received a gift subscription to the Rachael Ray magazine.  I plan to jump on the Maghound bandwagon, and stick with two of these (secret which two!) while perusing the site to figure out what new title to try.  I think many people will be in this boat – have two definite titles to subscribe and are open to trying a new one, especially since there is no year-long commitment (I believe my generation to be commitment-phobic).

MINE

Kris Connell

Kris Connell

Mine magazine is even more personalized than Maghound.  Trying an entirely new model with sole advertising support from luxury vehicle brand Lexxus, Time Inc. (partnered with American Express Publishing) offered consumers a magazine with chosen content and personalized ads.  Kris Connell, VP of Communications, Time Inc. took time out of her surely busy day to come and speak to us.  Connell has a wide variety of experience and now is in an ideal role as the head of internal communications, advertising and PR for Time Inc. (yet another woman with an inspiring career… and cute shoes!).

Thanks to Twitter, I’ve been on board with Mine since it launched and am the proud recipient of two editions.  Two, because the first run of the magazine suffered from a computer glitch, sending out the wrong combination of titles.  What could have been a disaster was handled well by Connell and her team, with an apology to consumers, an additional free copy of their “Mine” and the new, correct versions sent out.  The content available was pulled from eight Time Inc. and American Express titles: Travel & Leisure, Golf, InStyle, Money, Real Simple, Sports Illustrated, Time and Food & Wine.  While a digital or print edition was available, Connell said the majority of requests were for print; which is another indication that digital magazines are still working on acceptance.

This adventure in magazine publishing returned results far exceeding the original goals.  In a time when many advertisers are suffering and unhappy with their media placement, Lexxus definitely received their ROI.  When I asked Connell if this is a maintainable business model to be maintained past the free six issue trial period she said she’s not sure.

Is this a copyable ploy?  I think one reason of its success is the free trial, as well as the lack of creative content.  Since “Mine” is a combination of established content, it is free from the editorial process.  Could this possibly cannibalize the MagHound concept? Why would consumers want three separate magazines, when the key content could be in one?  We will have to wait and see if other media conglomerates jump on this nimble bandwagon…

Mine Magazine

NovelWhore Tweets

October 2019
M T W T F S S
« May    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  
if (WIDGETBOX) WIDGETBOX.renderWidget('6f7a561c-c271-445d-a120-8d99edb3e40d');Get the Penguin Classics book of the day widget and many other great free widgets at Widgetbox! Not seeing a widget? (More info)
Advertisements