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Cover Blurb:  “Treat yourself to this book, please–I can’t recommend it highly enough.” -Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love

Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society BookSweet but never boring.  Intense but never overdone.  Inspiring but never preaching.  Loving but never raunchy.  The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society is a rare novel, one that comes into our life without a sound, but leaves having made an imprint on our soul.

Such an odd, cumbersome title, and one that may have never appealed to me personally except Random House professionals, Susan Kamil, SVP, Editor-in-Chief, and Jane Von Mehren, VP, Publisher, Trade Paperbacks, came to my NYU SPI class to share their experience and the road to success.  This title is globally recognized as this book has been on the New York Times Bestseller List since publication in 2008 (read the inside story of how it achieved such fame in my column on Beneath the Cover, “The Making of a Bestseller”).  Small in stature (the trade paperback a mere 274 pages), this book may initially be cast-off as a whimsical historical fiction novel until you try to put it down… I dare you to leave it untouched for a full 24-hours once you’ve begun.

The characters are lively, quirky, and lovable as they communicate via hand-written letters in 1946, as they rediscover themselves and their world post the trauma and impact of World War II.  You find yourself wanting novelist Juliet Ashton as your own pen pal and quiet Dawsey Adams as a neighbor.  Twists and turns are discrete and natural so that you almost don’t realize when a revelation occurs and the impact in the character’s life.

This novel celebrates people who love books and the written word.  Text, language and history are embraced within remarkable friendships.

Though the era has passed, issues of love, hope, and the kindness of the human spirit will always be timeless and this book (I wager) is destined to become a classic alongside the titles of the authors celebrated in the text, including the Brontes, Austen, Shakespeare, etc… This book  appeals to a wide audience, as it is told from multiple perspectives allowing a glimpse into different psyches.  I agree with Elizabeth Gilbert’s quote, above, to give yourself the gift of this book.

  • NovelWhore’s Grade: A
  • Title: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society
  • Author: Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows
  • Publisher: Random House

Yesterday morning started out relatively sunny, before the snow flurries came.  As I was out strolling through to city I saw so many signs of spring I couldn’t resist from taking pictures.  See my collage, below, and retain hope that Spring will eventually “spring” in Chicago!

chicago-spring-collage-1

Wow, I feel this blog is like a tattoo – once you get started it becomes addicting and you want to add more and more (while I have no tattoos myself, I’ve been told this is true…). I would like to send a big thank you to both Nick and Jaxibella, while I have no idea how each of you discovered my blog I am so excited you did!

As I sit here drinking coffee in my pajamas looking at the foggy day out my window, in awe of the www (world wide web), I think about what else I am willing to share.  What immediately comes to mind is the sketch drawing I’ve been meaning to frame and hang on my wall for inspiration from Antoine De Saint Exupery’s “The Little Prince.”

My advice to you (and I tend to give decent advice, at least when my beer goggles aren’t in place at 2am) is to get out and buy this book.  An even $10 at any book store (though I suggest supporting your local independent seller) it will change your life.  A mere 85 pages, with pictures included, this is a story that will stick with you.

A life fable wrapped up in a cute fairy tale, this story encourages you to never just accept things at first glance and to always look deeper, both at the object and within yourself. Similar to Paulo Coelho’s “The Alchemist” (we’ll look at that book another time), it encourages the reader to follow dreams and reminds each person to “never fully become a grown up” – quote courtesy of an old friend.

From the back of “The Little Prince”: “And the pilot realizes that when life’s events are too difficult to understand, there is no choice but to succumb to their mysteries.”

The Little Prince, enlightening on an abysmal Chicago day

The Little Prince, enlightening on an abysmal Chicago day

  • Title: The Little Prince
  • Author: Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  • Publisher: A Harvest Book, an imprint of Harcourt, Inc.
  • NovelWhore’s Grade: A

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